New issue of IJEC with math related articles

A new issue of International Journal of Early Childhood has recently been published, and it contains two articles that focus on mathematics. The first article, “Mathematically-Relevant Input During Play of a Caregiver With a Visual Impairment and Her Toddler“, was written by Joanne Lee, Donna Kotsopoulos and Caryl-Anne Stordy. It has the following abstract:

This research investigated play between two caregivers, one with a visual impairment, and their 15-month-old daughter. The mother has a visual impairment. We aimed to identify the similarities and differences in mathematically-relevant input by comparing the 30-min naturalistic play session conducted separately between the mother–daughter and the father–daughter dyad. The mother in this research participated in two 5-week community-based early numeracy sessions with her daughter. Results revealed that the toddler engaged in more joint attention with her father who also produced more mathematically-relevant utterances than the mother. Furthermore, the toddler was often not in joint attention with her mother despite many of the mother’s attempts to talk about an object by touching. Implications for engaging in mathematically-relevant input by parents with a visual impairment with their pre-verbal children will be discussed.

The second article, which was more interesting to me personally, is entitled “The Mathematical Competencies of Toddlers Expressed in Their Play and Daily Life Activities in Norwegian Kindergartens“. The article was written by Elin Reikerås, Inger Kristine Løge and Ann-Mari Knivsberg. All of them work at my university, and I find the project they report from very interesting. Here is the abstract of their article:

Research on toddlers’ mathematical knowledge is sparse. Studies on children’s mathematical competencies before school age have mostly focused on older children. Few of the previous studies have included large groups of toddlers, few have been conducted in natural settings, and few have been directed at a broad field of mathematical knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate which mathematical competencies a large group of toddlers’ in Norwegian kindergartens expressed through play and daily life activities. A total of 1,003 children participated. Their competencies were registered when they were between 30 and 33 months. The assessment material consisted of 36 items, divided into three main areas: number and counting, geometry and problem solving. The information was collected through authentic assessment; the staff in the kindergartens observed the toddlers’ competencies in play and daily life activities. The competencies were registered as mastered, partly mastered or mastering not yet observed. The toddlers showed mathematical competencies in all areas observed. A wide dispersion was found; both for the total score and the subareas’ scores. The largest variance was found in number and counting. Our participants displayed lower levels of competencies in using number words and reciting number sequences than reported from previous studies and higher competencies in puzzle-making and following instructions on spatial words. The results indicate that the assessment material may be a valuable tool for the preschool teachers in identifying the variety of competencies mastered by the children in kindergarten. The need for future research is highlighted and discussed.

Their project–which is called “The learning child”– is a long-term project where they follow more than 1000 children’s development (in mathematics, language, social and motor skills) from the age of 2,5. In this article, they report from the mathematics part of the project. Another reason why the project is of personal interest to me, is that they use my oldest daughter in all presentations of the project 🙂 Below is a snapshot of the official presentation of the project (in Norwegian), where two photos of our daughter is displayed–one from when she was 2,5 and one from this year when she turned 7.

AERA 2012 – afterthoughts

The 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association is history, and I enjoyed it a lot! The conference started off Friday morning, April 13, with a number of interesting sessions. In the afternoon, the opening plenary lecture by Professor Linda T. Smith marked the official opening of the conference. In this session, a particular focus on indigineous education was made. To me, this represented a fairly new and very interesting set of perspectives. A refreshing start of such a huge conference!

I am not going to present a full overview of all the sessions I attended, because there is simply far too much to say about that! Instead, I will share some of my favourite moments from the conference.

I attended quite a few sessions from SIG-Research in Mathematics Education. I particularly enjoyed the one on “Mathematical Teachers’ Beliefs and Knowledge“. The presentation by Cindy Jong–where she told us about the MECS instrument–was of particular interest to me, but I found all papers and presentations in this session quite interesting.

Another very interesting session for me was the one on “Conceptual and Methodological Issues and Advances in Research on Epistemic Beliefs”. After this session, I got the opportunity to meet Barbara Hofer (who is one of the major names in this area of research). Among the papers presented in this session, I was particularly interested in the one that was presented by Krista R. Muis.

Finally, I went to a session where Wolff-Michael Roth was discussant. I must be honest and admit that the reason I went wasn’t because I found the focus of the session particularly interesting (somewhat, but not extremely)–I went to see Professor Roth live. He is one of those scholars who has a list of publications that is far beyond my comprehension (makes you wonder if he has more hours in his days than the rest of us…), and from the moment he started talking it was easy to understand that he had a knowledge and overview that was both wide and deep. Impressed!

AERA 2012 coming up soon!

The annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) is coming up this week, and I am looking forward to attending this year’s meeting! Last (and only!) time I attended the AERA conference was in 2009 in San Diego. This year, the conference is held in Vancouver (Canada), and I am looking forward to a great conference. I am presenting a paper in a symposium session this year. Our symposium session is entitled: Defining and Measuring What Math and Science Teachers Need to Know: Implications for Professional Development and will take place on Sunday morning (April 15), so if you are in Vancouver it would have been nice to see you there 🙂

Our symposium session is chaired by Professor Elaine Munthe (also from the University of Stavanger). The discussant in our session is Professor Hilda Borko (Stanford).

If interested, you can read our paper below:

First Asian Sourcebook in Mathematics Education

Professor Bharath Sriraman has just finished editing an exciting new book that is about to be published by Information Age Publishing. This new book is entitled “The First Asian Sourcebook in Mathematics Education: China, Korea, Singapore, Japan, Malaysia, and India. Below is the cover and table of contents to give you an exclusive first taste of the book!

Tribute to the Springer Author Academy

Being a researcher in mathematics education (or in any field, I guess) involves a lot of hard work. Some parts of that work are more enjoyable than others, and everyone has their own favorite part. Me, I love to write! Working with text, whether it is a scientific article, a conference paper, book chapter or even a blogpost like this; that’s the part of my work I love the most! That doesn’t imply, however, that writing is easy, or that I know all there is to know about it. Far from it! I keep learning, and sometimes I discover resources that are more useful than others.

Recently, I have been using the Springer Author Academy quite a lot, and I think it is a great resource for me as a scientific writer! It contains lots of useful information and tips about all aspects of the writing process, from even before the first draft to the final part of the peer review process. Actually, I am working on a conference paper for the 2012 PME-NA conference right now, and some of the tips from the Springer Author Academy have been really useful in the process of structuring my paper 🙂

So, if you are also involved with scientific research, and especially the writing of scientific literature, you might be interested in checking this out! And if you have some other useful links to share, I would be happy to know! Just use the comment field below! 

MKT in Ghana

My colleague Yaa Cole has written an article about her project on adapting and using the MKT instrument in Ghana. This article will appear in a forthcoming special issue in ZDM, and it has now been published online. The title of the article is: “Assessing elemental validity: the transfer and use of mathematical knowledge for teaching measures in Ghana“. The articles which are going to appear in the MKT section of the forthcoming special issue have now started to be published, and Dicky Ng’s article “Using the MKT measures to reveal Indonesian teachers’ mathematical knowledge: challenges and potentials” has also been published online. More articles are coming 🙂

Below is a preview of Yaa’s article (click to see a larger version!):

The Mathematics Education Research Blog Book

This blog is now a little less than four years old. Admittedly, I was much more active in the early phase of the blog’s history than I am now, but there has still been quite a lot of activity here over the last four years. For quite some time now I have been wondering about how much I have actually written on this blog. I mean, how many pages would it be if I put everything together? I just created an ebook of the entire archive to check it out, and below is the result 🙂

The Mathematics Enthusiast to feature NSF Math Science Partnership Projects

The (Montana) Mathematics Enthusiast, edited by Bharath Sriraman has been selected by the National Science Foundation’s Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program committee to assemble and publish a set of papers over the next two years to expand avenues for more MSP projects to share what they are learning about mathematics and science education through an internationally recognized peer-reviewed journal that is widely available. Papers will be selected from the Learning Network Conference scheduled to take place on January 23-24, 2012, in Washington, DC. This conference features about 100 MSP projects, including large partnerships targeting science and/or mathematics teaching and learning in specific grade bands or disciplinary areas, institute partnerships focusing on developing teacher leadership, partnership incubator (or “Start”) projects focusing on learning about institutional partnership development, and research and evaluation projects studying and supporting MSP and similar work. The overarching goal of the MSP program, which was created by Congress in 2002, is to increase K-12 student achievement in STEM subjects through consequential partnerships between higher education and K-12 institutions, involving STEM faculty in deep and meaningful ways.

New monography on the history of mathematics and mathematics education

Professor Bharath Sriraman has edited a new and interesting monograph called “Crossroads in the History of Mathematics and Mathematics Education”. The monograph, which is going to receive the number 12 in the “Monograph series in mathematics education“, will be published in December or January, but I have been lucky enough to receive a taster to share with the readers of my blog.

If you are interested in the history of mathematics and/or its relation to mathematics education, this book will probably be of high interest to you! The contents feature a section with different topics in the history and didactics of calculus and analysis, and a similar section on the history and didactics of geometry and number. A third section includes four chapters on the history of mathematics in mathematics education. The authors are among the most prominent researchers in these areas, and the table of contents (see below) looks interesting.

June issue of The Mathematics Enthusiast

June 2012 seems to be far away, but I have nonetheless been given the privilege to share with you the table of contents of the June issue of The Mathematics Enthusiast. As usual, the issue will appear on the journal’s web site, and the articles will then be freely available as downloadable pdf files. As you can see in the table of contents (below), the issue includes quite a few articles from Nordic researchers, and this is partly due to the inclusion of a section from the North Calotte Conference in Mathematics Education (Tromsø, 2010). So, although June is still quite a few months ahead, this is something to look forward to 🙂

Thanks a lot to the editor, Professor Bharath Sriraman, for allowing me once again to provide you with this preview here on my blog!